barrow v torquay matchthread

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Barra Marra
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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Barra Marra »

barrowfan wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 6:11 pm
Barra Marra wrote:
Mon Feb 03, 2020 4:53 pm


Not really no. I'm not actually going to take a ruler to the screen :lol:
Shucks! And I thought you were! :lol: :roll: ;)
Well, I might have, but don't tell anyone :?
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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

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Last edited by chipmunx on Mon Feb 03, 2020 8:56 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Bring it on!!!

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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Moribund »

The Athletic article about this match is a great read I'd you can get hold of it - explains a few things about why we play the way we do and shows how certain Evatt is that we're going up.

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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Matty »

Moribund wrote:
Tue Feb 04, 2020 2:31 pm
The Athletic article about this match is a great read I'd you can get hold of it - explains a few things about why we play the way we do and shows how certain Evatt is that we're going up.
https://theathletic.co.uk/1579893/2020/ ... guardiola/

Just realised it's one of those card 7 day trial things where it starts charging you at the end. Wonder what is meant by the bit in bold?
Last edited by Matty on Tue Feb 04, 2020 3:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Moribund
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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Moribund »

Matty wrote:
Tue Feb 04, 2020 3:16 pm
Moribund wrote:
Tue Feb 04, 2020 2:31 pm
The Athletic article about this match is a great read I'd you can get hold of it - explains a few things about why we play the way we do and shows how certain Evatt is that we're going up.
https://theathletic.co.uk/1579893/2020/ ... guardiola/

Just realised it's one of those card 7 day trial things where it starts charging you at the end. Wonder what is meant by the bit in bold?
Just the way that he's convinced that no other club in this league comes close to what we're doing. I've re-read it, and it's actually Rooney that says we are better than plenty of sides in League 2.

Also interesting that we supposedly have a bottom six budget.

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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Barra Marra »

Not bad for a no frills, physical side that's for for purpose ;)
We all live in the back of Holker Street, the back of Holker Street* :scarf:

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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Middleton Nick »

The bus is approaching Dover :D

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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Barra Marra »

Middleton Nick wrote:
Tue Feb 04, 2020 5:39 pm
The bus is approaching Dover :D
Enjoy your football break before getting back on! :lol:
We all live in the back of Holker Street, the back of Holker Street* :scarf:

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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Arvo »

Moribund wrote:
Tue Feb 04, 2020 5:27 pm
Matty wrote:
Tue Feb 04, 2020 3:16 pm


https://theathletic.co.uk/1579893/2020/ ... guardiola/

Just realised it's one of those card 7 day trial things where it starts charging you at the end. Wonder what is meant by the bit in bold?
Just the way that he's convinced that no other club in this league comes close to what we're doing. I've re-read it, and it's actually Rooney that says we are better than plenty of sides in League 2.

Also interesting that we supposedly have a bottom six budget.
OK, I'll be the one to ask... Any chance of a copy and paste of this article?
You want the obvious, you'll get the obvious.

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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Moribund »

Barrowcelona’ – the non-League team led by Rooney, influenced by Guardiola and playing beautiful, ballsy football


“We’ve scored some good goals,” Ian Evatt says. “One of them was after 24 passes. And we had another where every player touched the ball before it went in the net. Our fans started nicknaming us ‘Barrowcelona.’”



Evatt, who made more than 500 appearances for Derby County, QPR, Blackpool and Chesterfield before taking over as Barrow AFC’s manager, has a little chuckle as he looks around his office at his staff. “Barrowcelona,” he says again, almost under his breath.



Barrow is a long way from Barcelona. In fact, this Cumbrian industrial town is a long way from anywhere. Located at the end of a peninsula that overlooks the Irish Sea, Barrow-in-Furness is isolated and open to the elements. It is the sort of place where trees bend over to greet you.



“Gusts of up to 45mph tomorrow,” Evatt says, looking at the weather forecast on his phone and grimacing at the thought of how hard it will be for his team to play their brand of free-flowing football in those conditions.



“Brutal,” says Peter Atherton, the former Coventry, Sheffield Wednesday and Bradford City defender who is Barrow’s assistant manager.



Torquay United will be making the 698-mile round trip to face the National League leaders. Even when their coach turns off the M6, it will be the best part of another 40 minutes to Barrow. It’s one way in and one way out here. “The longest cul-de-sac in Britain,” says Lewis Duckmanton, Barrow’s analyst and goalkeeping coach.



Duckmanton is scrolling through his phone to find a few facts that are more pertinent to what we’ve been discussing, namely how Pep Guardiola’s influence stretches from the Etihad campus at Manchester City to the humble environs of Holker Street, the 110-year-old home of the best non-League team in the country.



Opta don’t gather statistics at this level but Duckmanton has now found the answers. “The average percentage of possession for us this season is 59,” he says. “Average number of passes is 507. The highest possession in a game was 81 per cent. We’ve got the best ball recovery time in the league, the most passes per match and the highest time of ball being in play.”



Evatt looks up from behind his desk. “Have you got your laptop?” he asks. “You can show him Dior Angus’ chance from the other night [against Solihull]. He doesn’t score but it’s a perfect pattern to what we work on.



“The keeper has it. He rolls it out to the middle of the three centre-halves, who steps out and raps a pass through the lines into the forward, who has come deep and rotated with the midfield player. He then switches play out to our left-sided centre-half, who has stepped in. Our left wing-back then makes a flat run behind their right-back and the ball gets threaded in behind and he plays a square pass, and Dior misses from two yards out.”



That Evatt can reel all that off, without the aid of any footage, says everything about the work Barrow do on the training ground. His team are encouraged to play with freedom and intensity but they also have choreographed movement patterns, especially when their goalkeeper has the ball.



After looking at that move against Solihull on the laptop, it feels like it would have been the perfect goal if Angus converted. “It’s as good as it gets,” Evatt replies. “You’re talking about all that happening in probably less than 10 seconds. It’s the incisiveness. It’s playing out from the back but playing out with a purpose. That isn’t something they’ve done off the cuff. It’s something we’ve worked on and drilled into them.”



Ball recovery time seems relevant too. “Again, that’s Pep’s influence — the six-second rule,” Evatt says. “If we’re not winning the ball back in six seconds, there’s something going wrong. Especially at this level. No disrespect but the more pressure you’ve got on the ball, the more people struggle with it.”



The Athletic’s interest in Barrow came about after another National League manager mentioned Evatt’s side’s style of football is unique at this level, especially their commitment to playing out from the back.



Yet Barrow are doing much more than playing attractive football. Despite having a bottom-six budget, they are top of the table, unbeaten since October and on course to return to the Football League for the first time in almost half a century, ever since they lost their place in a manner that still fuels anger and resentment in these parts.



“This football is not like anything we’ve ever seen before,” says Ryan Sutherland, who has followed the club for nearly 20 years and does everything from looking after the kit to working in the club shop, selling tickets and managing Barrow’s Twitter account. He is one of only two full-time staff on the operational side of the club.



“If you speak to some of our older fans tomorrow,” he says, “they get a bit emotional talking about it, especially the fact that we could go up this year. We have people coming into the club in the week now just for a chat about how good it would be if the club got promoted. It’s literally their dying wish to see League football here again.



“We’ve been nowhere near before. The closest we got was when we were in the play-offs for a brief spell four or five years ago under Paul Cox but the football was just, ‘Get it to the full-back and hoof to the centre-forward’. People just didn’t buy into that as much as they do now, so the way we’re playing clearly does make a difference.”



Barrow have just had five consecutive attendances of 2,000-plus for the first time since they were in the Football League. They are tapping into a new fanbase, aware that a generation of supporters were lost through the years spent in the wilderness, and in the process lifting some of the gloom in an area where the locals tend to drink from a glass that is half-empty. Indeed, according to a survey carried out by the Office for National Statistics six years ago, Barrow was deemed to be the least happy place in the United Kingdom.



“I think it’s one of those places where there’s an us-against-the-world mentality, where they feel hard done by. ‘We got voted out the Football League, no-one likes us, no-one wants to come up north’. There’s that siege mentality,” Evatt says. “In many ways, it’s like that now. But I think, in hindsight, you have to understand, they weren’t relegated from the League, they got voted out. So there’s that proper dislike for…”



“Everyone!” interrupts Duckmanton.



“For everyone, yeah,” Evatt adds, laughing.



For Evatt, who describes himself as “a modern-day coach with old-school values”, there was additional motivation at Barrow from day one. “Everybody I spoke to said that you can’t get out the National League playing football,” he says. “And that made me even more committed to doing what we do.”



When Evatt was appointed at the end of June 2018, the club was in a mess. Barrow had finished 20th the previous season, one point and one place above the relegation zone. Evatt, whose managerial experience was limited to the three games he spent in charge of Chesterfield as caretaker, didn’t even have enough players for a five-a-side team.



“We inherited a club where the connection with the fans was completely gone. They’d just survived the previous season, the crowds were low, the style of football was route one at best. And then we came in with this new philosophy and only four players, so we had to recruit a whole team in July.”



Evatt’s philosophy owes much to his time playing under Ian Holloway in a Blackpool team that won promotion to the Premier League in 2010 with what the former central defender describes as an “attacking, expansive and brave” style of football. “But the biggest thing that Ian changed was the mentality of our entire club. And that’s what I bought into the most,” Evatt says. “He wouldn’t accept that Blackpool were just happy to stay in the Championship. And he didn’t want us to accept that.”



The 38-year-old felt the same way about Barrow and the National League, yet he soon realised that both himself and Atherton had their work cut out when it came to implementing their football ideas. A simple rondo on the opening day turned into chaos. “The first training session, we couldn’t string three or four passes together; it was frantic,” Evatt says. “But then, six weeks later, we’re scoring goals when it’s 24 or 25 passes.”



Evatt brought in players who were comfortable on the ball and then it was all about training how they play by working on possession-based drills, passing combinations and repetitive shadow play exercises. Coaching, in other words. “I spend a lot of time studying Pep’s methods and training sessions, and other people that play a similar style and philosophy to us,” Evatt says.



Then there are what Evatt describes as the “non-negotiables”. Some are quite intriguing. For example, when Barrow play a 4-3-3 formation, their winger on the opposite side of the pitch to the ball has to stay high and wide even when they’re not in possession. “He cheats,” Evatt says. “Our centre-forward occupies their two centre-halves. And so it always gives us that out ball — bang, counter-attack.”



Another relates to the psychological side of the game. “At half-time, our players have to run in. That’s non-negotiable. It sends that mental message that we’re relentless. And you’ll see that tomorrow.”



One non-negotiable is absolutely fundamental to how Barrow play. “Regardless of what the opposition do [when Barrow have a goal-kick], whether they’re pressing high or not, my players have to show [for the ball]. Then, it comes down to decisions.



“If teams do commit bodies to stop us playing out, we will try and be brave, even if it means using the keeper [to create an overload] or the midfield players rotating. But we have this set plan where we [the three centre-halves] will go into the six-yard box as you are allowed to do now and the wing-backs will then stay high and wide.



“The midfield players will probably suck their midfield players in towards our goal if they’re going man-for-man and pressing high, and then we’ve got that opportunity to go bang, straight into Quigs [striker Scott Quigley], a bit like Ederson does with [Sergio] Aguero at times. And then, it’s more or less four-v-four. But our structure, how we look to play out, is non-negotiable.”



It is fascinating to listen to and feels like a ballsy way to set up at non-League level. Even though there are an increasing number of clubs trying to play football these days — Evatt and his staff list eight or nine in the National League — there is still a higher proportion that prioritise brawn over brains.



“It’s massively ballsy,” Evatt says, nodding. “But what is football? What do you believe in? I believe that football is there as an entertainment industry. Supporters work hard, 9-5, five or six days a week, to be able to afford to come to football. If my team are just going to set up to win games by set pieces and long balls, it’s not what I would want to spend my hard-earned money to watch.”



That said, Barrow’s own supporters had to be “re-educated” about the new style of football they were seeing and that process is ongoing, as The Athletic discovers 24 hours later. “When we first started, there were moans and groans — and there still are one or two when we recycle the ball. ‘Get it forward!’ ‘Get it in box!’” Evatt says, mimicking a northern accent.



Within the National League, managers and clubs have generally been very complimentary about the way that Barrow play. Yet there is also some curious post-match feedback at times that leaves Evatt and Atherton slightly baffled.



“When you go and speak to some managers, they say: ‘We’d love to play how you play but I haven’t got the players.’ Hang on a minute, your budget is three times what mine is — if you want to play football, recruit footballers. It’s that simple. Then coach them. Teach them. Improve them,” Evatt says.



“I don’t believe there are any footballers brought up to be physical, play for set pieces, direct. Nobody sets out to play that way. People do it because they think it gets them results. It might be OK for some teams and some managers to put up with that. I couldn’t sleep at night if I was going about trying to win football matches that way. I want my teams to be possession-based, attacking and free-scoring.”



Non-League football has come a long way, so much so that it feels almost unfair to still use that term to describe England’s fifth tier, especially as all but a few of the 24 clubs in the division are full-time. It feels like League Three in all but name now.



There is no shortage of pedigree either, bearing in mind that Notts County, Chesterfield, Wrexham and Stockport County are among the long list of former Football League clubs playing at this level and trying to claim one of the two promotion spots.



Only one National League club — Boreham Wood — has an average attendance of less than 1,000 this season, while some of the wages on offer would probably amaze football supporters in other countries. One National League striker is said to be picking up £2,800 a week. Barrow, who are run by local businessmen, pay nothing like that much. The average weekly salary is about £750.



Evatt, however, is committed to doing things as professionally as possible. His squad train in Manchester during the week, largely because that location widens the pool of players he is able to recruit, and stay overnight in a hotel for any game where the travel time exceeds a couple of hours.



That includes home matches in Barrow, where the players are put up in a hotel that sponsors the club to avoid spending hours in their cars on the day of the game. Events are often organised after training on a Friday so as to ensure that the supporters feel a connection with the team.



The routine prior to the Torquay game is typical for a Saturday home fixture. The players arrive at the stadium for just before 2pm on Friday and have a team meeting. Evatt runs through the strengths and weaknesses of Torquay, who are the only club to beat Barrow in the league since the start of September. There are a series of clips played on a projector screen to support the points that he is making, and it is difficult to imagine any analysis meeting being more thorough in League One or League Two.



“Any questions?” Evatt says at the end. The room remains silent.



“Listen, this is a great opportunity to get back to winning ways,” he adds. “I feel personally that they were two very good points on Saturday and Tuesday. Yes, we’ve had to dig. Yes, we’re not as free-flowing as we normally are. But we’re hard to beat, boys. We’ve lost one game since September 3rd. That’s something we should be proud of. But I want us to get back to that free-flowing attacking nature tomorrow.



“Right, training starts at 2.45pm at Furness College. Let’s go.”



With only 24 hours until the Torquay game, the session is light. There is a rondo to start, a number of relay races based around technical skills and a round-robin five-a-side tournament. Evatt finishes off by going through some attacking set-pieces.



Barrow started the season in a 4-3-3 formation but Evatt changed to a 3-4-1-2 after they lost six of the first nine matches. The turnaround since has been startling. Barrow have won 16 and drawn five of their next 22 league matches, picking up 53 points from a possible 66 and averaging almost two goals per game prior to Torquay’s visit.



They are a young, hungry and dynamic team. The average age of the side that will start against Torquay is 25 and only one player in that starting XI has made more than 100 Football League appearances. They do, however, have a name on their teamsheet that stands out.



John Rooney is Wayne’s younger brother and the Barrow captain. Aged 29, he had a brief spell with New York Red Bulls earlier in his career but has spent the majority of his time around this level. He plays as a deep-lying midfielder for Barrow, in the pivot role, which makes his 15-goal tally this season remarkable.



“The manager has bought players in who can all handle the ball really well, so we’re all comfortable in each other’s ability and the way we play out,” Rooney says as we talk after dinner at the team hotel. “The way we move the ball, the training sessions we do and the way we break teams down; it’s a really enjoyable style of football to play.



“If we keep doing well and manage to get promotion, which is the aim, we’ll go into League Two and I’d back ourselves to beat most teams in that division. I really don’t think we’d look out of place.”



Evatt walks into the cramped home dressing room just after 2pm on Saturday. A few of the match shirts are hanging up around the corner, in a little space next to a sink and the toilet. It feels as though the players are sitting on top of one another.




There are a couple of motivational signs on the wall. One says: “Can YOU be BRAVE? Not in terms of a 50-50 tackle but in possession of the ball.”



Evatt stands in front of the tactics board on the wall and talks calmly. “In terms of the messages we spoke about yesterday, it’s recognising what they’re doing. If there is a high press, we know we need to be ultra brave and we must use Roons, Whitey, Lewis — whoever it is — as that pivot to get out the other side.



“With the wind, we’re not sure that’s going to play a factor but Joel [goalkeeper Joel Dixon]; we’ve always got that option if we set up like that to hit the front two. Then, in the middle and final third, it’s when to take risks and when to keep possession and move the ball side to side.



“Wing-backs, you are vital to keeping the width. If their full-backs want to come in narrow, so as not to leave a back four two-on-two, which is what I think will happen, then you should be getting in all day. If it’s the other way around, and they want to go out and stop you two getting the ball, then, [SwearFilter] me, I would back our two [strikers] against their two all day every day.



“But first and foremost, like every game, we have to set a tempo that they can’t live with. I don’t want to hear: ‘We’ve had two tough away games’. That’s mental. I will look after you physically. But for 90 minutes, we have to give it our all. We are in a fantastic position. An unbelievable position. But we can’t take it for granted.



“We’ve had two draws. We get back to winning ways today. We do that by moving the ball from side to side, being intense in and out of possession, pressing the ball all over pitch. They can’t live with that. They’ve been on the coach for a long time — [SwearFilter] get after them early on.”



Evatt looks at his assistant. “Pete?”



“Just that tempo, high energy — but that’s not frenetic,” Atherton says. “Like we’ve touched on a little bit at times in the last two games, when we need to be calm and composed, that’s still the right tempo. You manage the tempo of the game. When you need to be explosive, you step it up and you cut through them.



“The other side is, just be positive with each other and in what you do as individuals. And the last thing: be a good team-mate.”



Evatt nods. “That’s it. Whatever you are as an individual to this team, bring that to the table. Do what you’re good at. That is enough to beat every team in this league because we are the best team in this league. No doubt. Facts prove it. But you have to win your individual one-v-one battles. Bring to the table what you do, and that is more than enough. OK, let’s go.”



John Pearce is leaning up against a barrier on Holker Street’s Popular Side, which is a long terrace that is partially covered by a blue-and-white striped roof and slowly filling up as the players go through their stretches in front of us.



A biting wind chills the spine. Almost everybody seems to be wearing a hat. Some of the players look cold and it is easy to see how a couple ended up with what Evatt describes as “borderline hypothermia” during a game last season.



Pearce smiles when asked how long he has been coming here. “I’ve been following the club since the 1950s,” he says. “The first game my dad brought me to was when we played Wolves in the FA Cup in 1959. I was a regular supporter through the sixties and I remember it well when we were relegated out of the league in 1972. I was at university and really distressed by what happened. I couldn’t believe it — it seemed so unfair. Now I’m looking forward to going back into the league… maybe!”



The story behind Barrow losing their Football League status seems to change every time you speak to someone. But what is beyond dispute is that Barrow, at a time when clubs who finished near the foot of the old fourth division (now League Two) had to apply for re-election, lost their place at the expense of Hereford United.



There was no promotion system in place for non-League clubs in those days and Hereford, on the back of that famous FA Cup victory over Newcastle and that Ronnie Radford goal, had a groundswell of support behind them when it came to lobbying for votes.



Crewe Alexandra and Stockport, who had finished below Barrow in the table, were voted back in. It then came down to Barrow and Hereford. After a second ballot, Barrow’s 51-year stay in the Football League was over. According to Phil Yelland, the club’s historian, it was “strongly rumoured that a lot of teams did not like travelling to Barrow”.



Asked what promotion this season would mean to the people of Barrow, Pearce adds: “I know what it would mean to me. It would right the wrongs of 48 years ago.”



“How’s the pitch?” asks Evatt as Sam Hird walks back into the dressing room after finishing the warm-up.



“Shite,” Hird replies.



“Is it?” Evatt says, sounding a little concerned.



“Yeah but it’s the same for both, isn’t it?” Hird says.



Barrow have spent money on improving their pitch, which is obviously crucial to the way that they look to play, but an extremely wet winter has done nothing to help them. There is a fair bit of sand on the surface and, with it blowing a gale out there too, it is clear that it is going to be a difficult afternoon.



It is time for a final few words in the dressing room. “OK, in terms of the wind, if we’re kicking with it, you know we can go proper full press, high up the pitch,” Evatt says. “Make sure the back line keeps the team compact. They won’t be able to get out. We’ll pen them in and it will become wave after wave. If we are against it, we must be ultra brave and make sure we play out.”



Evatt reminds the players to check their roles when it comes to the set pieces, which are pinned up on the wall, and tells his two strikers, the No 10 and the two wing-backs to “make sure at least one of you is stretching the back line to create space for everybody else”.



“It’s a great chance for us,” Evatt adds as the players prepare to go out. “Let’s go and makes sure we get the win today. Everything we’ve got. Full press, full intensity, good pace with our passing and we’ll go and hurt these. Come on, let’s go.”



The wind is horrendous and Barrow are playing into it in the first half after Torquay elect to change ends. It is so strong that on a couple of occasions, the ball sails into the air and stops, hanging for a moment before drifting backwards.



Torquay are pressing high but Barrow still try and play out whenever possible — sometimes to their detriment. Hird, the right-sided centre-back in Barrow’s three-man defence, receives a pass from his goalkeeper deep inside his own half that, on a lifeless pitch and with a Torquay player closing him down, forces a hurried ball down the line that drifts out of play in the wind.



Evatt yells at Joel Dixon, the goalkeeper. “Joel! Joel! There has to be a benefit from it. Not for the sake of it!”



Barrow start to play with a bit more control but there are the first murmurs of frustration as Evatt’s players patiently probe on the right. “Get it in! Get it in!” shouts a lone but loud and uneducated voice from the 1,000-seat main stand behind the two dug-outs.



Evatt hears the comment, turns around and shows his annoyance.



The game is goalless at half-time but Evatt sounds happy as he strides towards the tunnel. “We have to recognise the conditions and be better,” he says. ‘There has to be a purpose for why we’re playing out. But I’m delighted with 0-0 at half-time in that wind.”



Evatt talks to his players about the importance of keeping their discipline in the second half, and making sure that any longer passes are hit diagonally because of the wind being in their favour now. But his overriding message during the interval is patience. “Calm and composed,” he says. “Sixty minutes is that magic number when they get tired and then we’ll take over.”



As it happens, it is Torquay who score shortly after the hour-mark and in highly controversial circumstances. The ball is turned home by Kyle Cameron but the assistant referee has his flag up for offside. Barrow take the free kick quickly — something they’re always encouraged to do — but the referee pulls back play and decides to go and speak to his assistant.



The goal is allowed to stand, sparking angry protests by the home players and celebrations among the 77 hardy souls (two of them wearing shorts) who have come from Torquay.



It seems a bizarre decision and hard to see how the referee could be in a position to overrule his colleague. In the commotion that follows, Rooney and Evatt are booked.



In a way, though, it was the best thing that could have happened to Barrow. Fuelled by a sense of injustice, 2,500 home supporters find their voice and Barrow’s players start to attack Torquay with renewed conviction.



The ball drops to Rooney on the edge of the penalty area. The night before, Evatt had remarked that Rooney is “deadly from 20-25 yards”. He’s right, too. Rooney expertly guides a terrific half-volley into the top corner for his 16th goal of the season.



The complexion of the game has now totally changed and it is no real surprise when Barrow, who are passing the ball with increasing confidence, score a second four minutes later.



Scott Quigley, who has led the line superbly throughout, beautifully lobs the Torquay keeper after running through on goal. Evatt, his staff and the substitutes raucously celebrate on the touchline. Barrow are on their way to another three points.



“Roons, what a [SwearFilter] finish!’” shouts one voice as the players arrive back in the dressing room.





The cheering, shouting and back-slapping stops as Evatt walks in and shuts the door.



“Hey, listen, that right there is proper character from everybody. And I mean that,” he says. “It would have been easy after having that goal go against us to turn it in and blame the ref and the linesman. Do you know what that goal did to us? It woke us up. We went through the gears and we got on top.”



Evatt looks at the match-winner. “Scott Quigley, that is the best centre-forward’s performance I have seen in a long, long time. I mean it. That is [SwearFilter] brilliant. And that’s why I get on at you, and these [SwearFilter] demand of you, because they know you can do that. Well done.”



Everybody in the dressing room applauds Quigley.



“There’s no two ways about it; that is a huge result,” Evatt continues. “We will enjoy tonight and then we refocus for Tuesday. As a squad, as a unit, I love the way we celebrate together. It means everything to us. I’m proud of every single one of you.”



And so are the people of Barrow.

Moribund
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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Moribund »

Arvo wrote:
Tue Feb 04, 2020 6:11 pm
Moribund wrote:
Tue Feb 04, 2020 5:27 pm


Just the way that he's convinced that no other club in this league comes close to what we're doing. I've re-read it, and it's actually Rooney that says we are better than plenty of sides in League 2.

Also interesting that we supposedly have a bottom six budget.
OK, I'll be the one to ask... Any chance of a copy and paste of this article?
I presumed it would be too long to post - hopefully it doesn't get deleted.

Bombadel
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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Bombadel »

thanks for posting that, it is very detailed, appreciate it was windy, but we've had much worse, but the guy makes it sounds like the antarctic, with his "A biting wind chills the spine." either my body fat is doing its job, or it feels like we've had a very mild winter so far.
Last edited by Bombadel on Tue Feb 04, 2020 6:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Slenderhead
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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Slenderhead »

Wow. What a read... 👍🏻👏
pie, chips, peas, and gravy, with a pie on the side please

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Jonty
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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Jonty »

Brilliant reading and a great behind the scenes review. We are never going to shake that outsider perception of who we are as a town, or a club, but we can handle that...With his references to Pep, I reckon Evo has read “The Barcelona Way”. A great book. All about creating a high performance winning culture.....with his own style and experiences picked up along the way of course.
Last edited by Jonty on Tue Feb 04, 2020 7:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Still searching for the Young Soul Rebels
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mYxZUJt4xc

Barra Marra
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Re: barrow v torquay matchthread

Post by Barra Marra »

Brilliant read :scarf:
We all live in the back of Holker Street, the back of Holker Street* :scarf:

*the above statement may not actually reflect real life circumstances

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